MODERN JEWISH CUISINE THAT’S TAKEN CENTURIES TO GET HERE

Restaurant 1701 is London’s first fine dining experience celebrating the world of Jewish cuisine.

The restaurant sits within the grounds of Britain’s oldest synagogue, Bevis Marks, built in 1701 and designated a building of national interest.

We are very pleased to announce that Restaurant 1701 has been included in the Michelin Guide Great Britain & Ireland 2014. It is the only kosher restaurant listed in the UK and one of only three in the world.

 

MODERN JEWISH CUISINE THAT’S TAKEN CENTURIES TO GET HERE

Restaurant 1701 is London’s first fine dining experience celebrating the world of Jewish cuisine.

The restaurant sits within the grounds of Britain’s oldest synagogue, Bevis Marks, built in 1701 and designated a building of national interest.

We are very pleased to announce that Restaurant 1701 has been included in the Michelin Guide Great Britain & Ireland 2014. It is the only kosher restaurant listed in the UK and one of only three in the world.

 

Frucht Zup

Central European cooking features compotes and soups made from fresh and dried fruit, with Hungarian Cherry Soup a big favourite. A popular dessert amongst Jews who want to maintain kashrut by not eating milk-based desserts after meat, this central European variant also featured plums, peaches, raspberries and strawberries.

Adafina

When the Sephardim arrived in northwest Africa after the Spanish Inquisition, they merged their dishes with the native cuisine, exemplified by the North African Sabbath stews known as dafina (Arabic for ‘covered’). Adafina is the Spanish version.

Couscous aux sept légumes

For Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year), which falls on the first day of the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, Moroccan Jews traditionally serve couscous with a stew containing seven symbolic vegetables: carrots, onions, turnips, celery, pumpkin, cabbage and chickpeas. A special prayer would be recited before eating each vegetable.

Gefilte Fish

Gelfite fish originated in Germany, probably in the fourteenth century and involved carefully removing the flesh from the fish, chopping, seasoning and stuffing (gefüllt in German) it into the skin; with the fish then sewn up and baked. Eventually, the process was simplified by eliminating the stuffing step!

Jewish Penicillin

Often referred to as Jewish penicillin because of its perceived medicinal qualities, in many Ashkenazi households no Friday night meal can begin without a bowl of golden chicken soup.

Israeli Salad

Popularised in Israel by those living on kibbutz and known as salat yerakot (Hebrew for ‘vegetable salad’), it is typically a chopped salad of finely diced tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, parsley, green and red peppers, and dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.

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