MODERN JEWISH CUISINE THAT’S TAKEN CENTURIES TO GET HERE

Restaurant 1701 is London’s first fine dining experience celebrating the world of Jewish cuisine.

The restaurant sits within the grounds of Britain’s oldest synagogue, Bevis Marks, built in 1701 and designated a building of national interest.

We are very pleased to announce that Restaurant 1701 has been included in the Michelin Guide Great Britain & Ireland 2015.

 

MODERN JEWISH CUISINE THAT’S TAKEN CENTURIES TO GET HERE

Restaurant 1701 is London’s first fine dining experience celebrating the world of Jewish cuisine.

The restaurant sits within the grounds of Britain’s oldest synagogue, Bevis Marks, built in 1701 and designated a building of national interest.

We are very pleased to announce that Restaurant 1701 has been included in the Michelin Guide Great Britain & Ireland 2015.

 

Sabich

Sabich was brought to Israel by Iraqi Jews in the 1940s and 1950s. On the Sabbath, when no cooking is allowed, Iraqi Jews ate a cold meal of precooked fried eggplant, cooked potatoes and hard-boiled eggs. One theory is that the name Sabich comes from the Arabic word sabah, which means “morning”.

Gefilte Fish

Gelfite fish originated in Germany, probably in the fourteenth century and involved carefully removing the flesh from the fish, chopping, seasoning and stuffing (gefüllt in German) it into the skin; with the fish then sewn up and baked. Eventually, the process was simplified by eliminating the stuffing step!

Chopped Liver

A favourite Ashkenazi starter, Gehakte Leber or chopped liver is one of the best known of all Jewish dishes because of repeated references by Jewish comics. The dish dates back to the medieval Alsatian communities where, of course, foie gras also originated.

Israeli Salad

Popularised in Israel by those living on kibbutz and known as salat yerakot (Hebrew for ‘vegetable salad’), it is typically a chopped salad of finely diced tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, parsley, green and red peppers, and dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.

Jewish Penicillin

Often referred to as Jewish penicillin because of its perceived medicinal qualities, in many Ashkenazi households no Friday night meal can begin without a bowl of golden chicken soup.

Jerusalem Mixed Grill

Me’orav Yerushalmi is a grilled meat dish combining an assortment of meats and offal with wonderful spices and fried onions. Considered by some to be an adaptation of the English Mixed Grill brought to Israel by the British Army before 1948, it is said to be have been invented in Jerusalem’s Mahane Yehuda Market.

Couscous aux sept légumes

For Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year), which falls on the first day of the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, Moroccan Jews traditionally serve couscous with a stew containing seven symbolic vegetables: carrots, onions, turnips, celery, pumpkin, cabbage and chickpeas. A special prayer would be recited before eating each vegetable.

Adafina

When the Sephardi Jews arrived in northwest Africa after the Spanish Inquisition, they merged their dishes with the native cuisine, an example being the North African Sabbath stews known as dafina (Arabic for ‘covered’). Adafina is the Spanish version.

Sachertorte

Jews entered the chocolate business in the seventeenth century, at the same time as the Church condemned it as ‘the beverage of Satan’ and it was used as an ingredient in Jewish cuisine before most others. There are several examples of chocolate desserts but perhaps the most famous is the cake created in Vienna in 1832, by a Jewish baker called Franz Sacher.

Malabi

Probably hailing from Turkey, malabi is traditionally a milky pudding flavoured with vanilla, rosewater and topped with sugar syrup – similar in consistency to a panna cotta. Extremely popular in Israel, where street vendors and chefs have developed many variations, we believe our version is particularly beautiful and delicious.

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